Normal hours of building entry to Colorado Center are 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Access to the buildings during the evenings, weekends and on holidays require use of a building access card, which may be obtained from the Management Office. The office buildings at Colorado Center will be closed and secured on the following days:
These designer steel lockers are built to last and feature cool colors that kids and teens will love. Great for storing school supplies, books, back packs, clothes, shoes, and much more. All lockers are Greenguard Certified. Durable welled steel construction with poser coat finish. Louvered vents on doors for proper air ventilation. Recessed handle with finger-lift latch will accommodate a padlock (not included). Single tier locker includes top compartment shelf, two side hooks and center hook.
Standing 72'' tall and just 12'' wide, this single-tier locker brings space-conscious storage to bedrooms, break rooms, and beyond. This design is awash in a crisp white finish and sports brushed nickel hardware – including a convenient double hook for coats and bags. On the front, you’ll find a chrome-plated nameplate and latch (locks not included). This product comes backed by a five-year manufacturer warranty. To clean, simply wipe down with a damp cloth.
One thing that box lockers can’t do that nearly all other styles of lockers can (depending on their height) is hang garments. Box lockers allow for a maximum number of units in a small space, but are too small to hang your jacket. Garment lockers utilize box lockers, and a coat rod is mounted under the lockers between the vertical sections. This allows for employees to hang full length garments, while still being able to secure their other personal items in their individual lockers.
Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys.

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