Standing 72'' tall and just 12'' wide, this single-tier locker brings space-conscious storage to bedrooms, break rooms, and beyond. This design is awash in a crisp white finish and sports brushed nickel hardware – including a convenient double hook for coats and bags. On the front, you’ll find a chrome-plated nameplate and latch (locks not included). This product comes backed by a five-year manufacturer warranty. To clean, simply wipe down with a damp cloth.
Stepped/2-step lockers are two-tier lockers, usually available only in 15-inch (38-cm.) width; but the compartments and their doors have an L-shaped cross-section, which causes the division between the doors to follow a zigzag pattern. This configuration enables more hanging height to be included in both upper and lower lockers; but part of each compartment (the lower part of the upper one and the upper part of the lower one) will be only half the usual width of two-tier lockers.

Keep your classroom or daycare organized with the 8 Section Coat Locker. This tiered child safe Coat Locker provides a preschooler a spot to store their belongings; each locker is fitted with the dual double-sided hanger that offers them a place to hang their coats and backpacks. Additionally, there is a small cubby above each section with translucent 3” letter trays. The open access design provides easy access and visibility for their personal items and the finish is perfect for any...
Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys.

Locker

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