One thing that box lockers can’t do that nearly all other styles of lockers can (depending on their height) is hang garments. Box lockers allow for a maximum number of units in a small space, but are too small to hang your jacket. Garment lockers utilize box lockers, and a coat rod is mounted under the lockers between the vertical sections. This allows for employees to hang full length garments, while still being able to secure their other personal items in their individual lockers.
Locking options: various types of key locking or padlocking facility are available now. Key locking options include flush locks, cam locks, or locks incorporated into a rotating handle; padlocking facilities may be a simple hasp and staple, or else a padlocking hole may be included in a handle, often called a latchlock. More modern designs include keyless operation, either by coin deposit (which may or may not be returned when use of the locker terminates), or by using electronic keypads to enter passwords for later reopening the locker. Some older lockers used a drop-latch which was incorporated into the door handle, and slid up and down and could be padlocked at the bottom in the "down" position, but these are less used now. Three-point locking is not possible with this type of latch, because it needs to be operated by means of a latch that rotates rather than slides up and down; so this drop-latch is probably a less secure locking option, which may be why it is little used nowadays. Prefect Combination locks are very popular in school lockers used in the UK due to their ease of use and the time and cost saved in the removal of locker keys.

Locker

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