Division 10 — Specialties Lockers: Division 10 — Specialties is a category within the National Master Specification (NMS) set of guidelines developed by Public Works and Government Services Canada. Division 10 — Specialties items that could be required within a locker room (to meet commercial building and construction regulations) are lockers, washroom accessories, toilet compartments, and toilet partitions. Lockers are constructed of two sides: a back, top and a bottom. Different types of materials are used in locker manufacturing, offering a wide variety of metal lockers, stainless steel lockers, solid plastic lockers, solid phenolic lockers, and custom lockers. A padlock is the most common way to lock a locker; however, you can also use a keyed cylinder lock, built in combination locks or keypad locks. There are a lot of optional extras that can be utilized for lockers, for example: bases, sloping tops, end panels, customized shelves and hooks as well as the locking method (coin-operated lockers are another option). The environment is the best way to distinguish what type of locker will be required for which type of space. For example, if you are putting gym lockers into a humid area, or anywhere close to showers, stainless steel or solid plastic lockers would be most suitable because they are moisture-resistant and rust-resistant. Wood lockers would not be appropriate for this type of environment because the moisture from the humidity would rot the wood.
Once the Union Station redevelopment is complete, these buses will have a pristine, new hub—underneath 17th Street between the historic Union Station and the Light Rail Plaza. This beautiful underground bus terminal will accommodate 22 bus bays for easy, congestion-free transfers. There’s also an underground, enclosed passenger concourse so you can get where you’re going easily and comfortably.
Our double lockers are a highly popular choice among our customers and for this reason, they rarely stick around our inventory for long. The main advantage of this style is you can save twice the floor space per compartment when compared to traditional, single tier compartments. Double tier columns are frequently utilized as school lockers because they make it easy for users to share a single locker without too much interference.
The storage lockers were a “pilot,” the kind of small test that city government frequently uses to test a new or controversial idea. The city offered up the lockers for individuals to use for months-long stretches. At the time, city officials warned that “misuse of the lockers, vandalism, or other unanticipated results,” could force them to cancel the project.
Once the Union Station redevelopment is complete, these buses will have a pristine, new hub—underneath 17th Street between the historic Union Station and the Light Rail Plaza. This beautiful underground bus terminal will accommodate 22 bus bays for easy, congestion-free transfers. There’s also an underground, enclosed passenger concourse so you can get where you’re going easily and comfortably.
Not sure why you couldn't claim check your backpacks as described on the Rockies website. Softside bags are a permitted item but probably too large, so would be in the restricted category. Still, they have the claim check tent for those items. Food seems to be a permitted item, except that any fruit or veggie larger than a grapefruit must be sliced.

Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.

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