From 1953 to 1989, the Rocky Flats Plant, a DOE nuclear weapon facility that was about 15 miles from Denver, produced fissile plutonium "pits" for nuclear warheads. A major fire at the facility in 1957, as well as leakage from nuclear waste stored at the site between 1958 and 1968, resulted in the contamination of some parts of Denver, to varying degrees, with plutonium-239, a harmful radioactive substance with a half-life of 24,200 years.[37] A study by the Jefferson County health director, Dr. Carl Johnson, in 1981, linked the contamination to an increase in birth defects and cancer incidence in central Denver and nearer Rocky Flats. Later studies confirmed many of his findings.[38][39][40] Plutonium contamination was still present outside the former plant site as of August 2010,[41] and presents risks to building the envisioned Jefferson Parkway,[42] which would complete Denver's automotive beltway.

Nuestra web utiliza cookies para asegurarnos de que ofrecemos al usuario el mejor servicio y la mejor experiencia en nuestra web. Si continua navegando por ella, asumiremos que está de acuerdo con nuestra política de cookies y que acepta recibir todas las cookies de nuestra web (incluyendo las de terceros). Puede leer más sobre nuestra política de cookies pulsando aquí.
Constructed of 16-Gauge steel Salsbury 61000 series single Constructed of 16-Gauge steel Salsbury 61000 series single tier metal lockers offer privacy and space for personal storage needs. Single tier metal lockers are available in a gray tan or blue powder coated finish and as unassembled or assembled units. These durable lockers are available in heights of 5 ft. ...  More + Product Details Close
Mass transportation throughout the Denver metropolitan area is managed and coordinated by the Regional Transportation District (RTD). RTD operates more than 1,000 buses serving over 10,000 bus stops in 38 municipal jurisdictions in eight counties around the Denver and Boulder metropolitan areas. Additionally, RTD operates nine rail lines, the A, B, C, D, E, F, L, R, W, and H with a total of 57.9 miles (93.2 km) of track, serving 44 stations. All lines are Light Rail except the A Line and B Line, which are Commuter Rail, with the G Line to the suburb of Arvada, opening soon pending federal approval in 2017, and the N Line to Commerce City and Thorton, soon to open in 2018.[152] FasTracks is a Commuter Rail, Light Rail and Bus expansion project approved by voters in 2004, which will serve neighboring suburbs and communities. The W line, or West line, opened in April 2013 serving Golden/Federal Center. An Express Bus Service, known as the Flatiron Flyer, serves to connect Boulder and Denver. The service, billed as Bus Rapid Transit, has been accused of Bus rapid transit creep for failing to meet the majority of BRT requirements, including level boarding and all-door entry. A Commuter Rail connection to Boulder and its suburb of Longmont, also part of the FasTracks ballot initiative and an extension of the B Line, is to be finished sometime after 2040. In addition, the N Line, under FasTracks, is another Commuter Rail line currently under construction with an expected completion date in 2018 and will serve the suburbs of Commerce City and Thorton.
At Albuquerque, New Mexico, Denver Thruway connections are made daily with the Amtrak Southwest Chief. Additionally, the Ski Train operated on the former Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, which took passengers between Denver and the Winter Park Ski Resort, but it is no longer in service. The Ski Train made its final run to Winter Park on March 29, 2009. The service was revived on a trial basis in 2016 with a great amount of local fanfare. Further development of a mountain corridor rail option, though publicly popular, has been met with resistance from politicians, namely the director of Colorado Department of Transportation[154][not in citation given]. The Ski Train did return to service under Amtrak with the name "Winter Park Express" in 2017, and currently runs only on Saturdays, Sundays, and major holidays during the winter ski seasons.
In the summer of 1858, during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush, a group of gold prospectors from Lawrence, Kansas established Montana City as a mining town on the banks of the South Platte River in what was then western Kansas Territory. This was the first historical settlement in what was later to become the city of Denver. The site faded quickly, however, and by the summer of 1859 it was abandoned in favor of Auraria (named after the gold-mining town of Auraria, Georgia) and St. Charles City.[20]
As of 2010, 72.28% (386,815) of Denver residents aged five and older spoke only English at home, while 21.42% (114,635) spoke Spanish, 0.85% (4,550) Vietnamese, 0.57% (3,073) African languages, 0.53% (2,845) Russian, 0.50% (2,681) Chinese, 0.47% (2,527) French, and 0.46% (2,465) German. In total, 27.72% (148,335) of Denver's population aged five and older spoke a language other than English.[79]
Tornadoes are rare west of the I-25 corridor; however, one notable exception was an F3 tornado that struck 4.4 miles south of downtown on June 15, 1988. On the other hand, the suburbs east of Denver and the city's east-northeastern extension (Denver International Airport) can see a few tornadoes, often weak landspout tornadoes, each spring and summer—especially during June with the enhancement of the Denver Convergence Vorticity Zone (DCVZ). The DCVZ, also known as the Denver Cyclone, is a variable vortex of storm-forming air flow usually found north and east of downtown, and which often includes the airport.[60][61] Heavy weather from the DCVZ can disrupt airport operations.[62][63] In a study looking at hail events in areas with a population of at least 50,000, Denver was found to be ranked 10th most prone to hail storms in the continental United States.[64] In fact, Denver has received three of the top 10 costliest hailstorms in United States history, which occurred on July 11, 1990; July 20, 2009; and May 8, 2017 respectively.

Each Casillero del Diablo wine is the result of carefully selected grapes grown in some of Chile's most award-winning winemaking regions, from the Limari Valley in the North to the Maule Valley in the South. The unique characteristics of each of our vineyards are reflected within the flavours and aromas of each bottle. This range of wines brings to you the best that Chile has to offer.


Denver is ranked as a Beta- world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network. With an estimated population of 704,621 in 2017, Denver is the 19th-most populous U.S. city, and with a 17.41% increase since the 2010 United States Census, it has been one of the fastest-growing major cities in the United States.[15] The 10-county Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated 2017 population of 2,888,227 and is the 19th most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical area.[16] The 12-city Denver-Aurora, CO Combined Statistical Area had an estimated 2017 population of 3,515,374 and is the 15th most populous U.S. metropolitan area.[17] Denver is the most populous city of the 18-county Front Range Urban Corridor, an oblong urban region stretching across two states with an estimated 2017 population of 4,895,589.[18] Denver is the most populous city within a 500-mile (800 km) radius and the second-most populous city in the Mountain West after Phoenix, Arizona. In 2016, Denver was named the best place to live in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.[19]
Although Denver's nickname is the "Mile-High City" because its official elevation is one mile above sea level, defined by the elevation of the spot of a benchmark on the steps of the State Capitol building, the elevation of the entire city ranges from 5,130 to 5,690 feet (1,560 to 1,730 m). According to Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) and the National Elevation Dataset, the city's elevation is 5,278 feet (1,609 m), which is reflected on various websites such as the National Weather Service.[51]
In the closing years of the 19th century Don Melchor de Concha y Toro discovered that his most treasured wines had been pilfered from the “casillero” (cellar) beneath his family home. To discourage further theft, the enterprising Don spread a rumor that his deepest, darkest cellars were haunted by the devil. Today, the original Concha y Toro family estate, complete with its Devil’s Cellar, is Chile’s leading tourist destination!
×