We tend to think of Chile as a source of cheap, decently made (in other words, “drinkable”) wine suitable for parties and pairing with out-of-season apples and avocados. Who can argue with a magnum of Concha y Toro cabernet sauvignon priced at $10 or less? Or a bottle of Concha y Toro’s more substantial Casillero del Diablo line at the same price? Santa Rita’s 120 brand sauvignon blanc is a reliable, inexpensive refresher, and Cono Sur churns out a wide variety of good-value wines.
Big news—we’re excited to announce that Luxer One has become a Certified RealPage Exchange AppPartner. We've been working to build this integration with the RealPage team to make life easier for our customers. This deeper partnership with RealPage allows us to do just that—we're working together to provide our shared customers with an unparalleled level of service.   Beyond software, RealPage has also selected Luxer One as the hardware provider to service RealPage clients’ package locker needs. Read further for details on the RealPage and Luxer One integration.    This article was published as a press release on June 12, 2018. You can check out the full release here. […]
How different soils make for different styles of Chilean carmenere: “Where you stand on carmenere depends on where you sit. Younger soils, alluvial soils, tend to produce simple wines with less complexity of tannins. Wines from ancient mother-rock soils — soils like limestone, schist or granite — are quite different. When the rock is hard, the wines tend to have tight structure, but when the rock breaks up and there is more clay in the soil, the tannic structure gains roundness and the wine is more immediately approachable.” — Marcelo Papa, winemaker for Casillero del Diablo and Marques de Casa Concha, Chile.

In 2005, Denver became the first major city in the U.S. to vote to make the private possession of less than an ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 and older.[121] The city voted 53.5 percent in favor of the marijuana legalization measure, which, as then-mayor John Hickenlooper pointed out, was without effect, because the city cannot usurp state law, which at that time treated marijuana possession in much the same way as a speeding ticket, with fines of up to $100 and no jail time.[121] Denver passed an initiative in the fourth quarter of 2007 requiring the mayor to appoint an 11-member review panel to monitor the city's compliance with the 2005 ordinance.[122] In 2012, Colorado Amendment 64 was signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper and at the beginning of 2014 Colorado became the first state to allow the sale of marijuana for recreational use.[123]
All roads in the downtown grid system are streets (e.g. 16th Street, Stout Street). Roads outside that system that travel east/west are given the suffix "avenue" and those that head north and south are given the "street" suffix (e.g. Colfax Avenue, Lincoln Street). Boulevards are higher capacity streets and travel any direction (more commonly north and south). Smaller roads are sometimes referred to as places, drives (though not all drives are smaller capacity roads, some are major thoroughfares) or courts. Most streets outside the area between Broadway and Colorado Boulevard are organized alphabetically from the city's center.

Denver has many nationally recognized museums, including a new wing for the Denver Art Museum by world-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, the second largest Performing Arts Center in the nation after Lincoln Center in New York City and bustling neighborhoods such as LoDo, filled with art galleries, restaurants, bars and clubs. That is part of the reason why Denver was, in 2006, recognized for the third year in a row as the best city for singles.[93] Denver's neighborhoods also continue their influx of diverse people and businesses while the city's cultural institutions grow and prosper. The city acquired the estate of abstract expressionist painter Clyfford Still in 2004 and built a museum to exhibit his works near the Denver Art Museum.[94] The Denver Museum of Nature and Science holds an aquamarine specimen valued at over $1 million, as well as specimens of the state mineral, rhodochrosite. Every September the Denver Mart, at 451 E. 58th Avenue, hosts a gem and mineral show.[95] The state history museum, History Colorado Center, opened in April 2012. It features hands-on and interactive exhibits, artifacts and programs about Colorado history.[96] It was named in 2013 by True West Magazine as one of the top-ten "must see" history museums in the country.[97] History Colorado's Byers-Evans House Museum and the Molly Brown House are nearby.

casillero Denver

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